2013 Schedule

Monday, May 27 | Tuesday, May 28 | Wednesday, May 29 | Thursday, May 30 | Friday, May 31


Monday, May 27, 2013


Rm. 301, Lillooet Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning

Video:

Note: The session will start at approximately 9:15AM PST.

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Watch it on YouTube.

Ah Yes, But That Would Never Work with My Students…

Simon Bates, PhD
Senior Advisor, Teaching and Learning
Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

One of the main challenges in trying to develop a framework for effective learning and teaching is to be able to articulate principles and implications for practice that translate across disciplines and different levels of educational experience.

On the one hand, articles that are too theoretical or specific leave faculty members daunted or unsure how to actually instantiate this in their teaching, are not particularly helpful to the majority. On the other hand, self-help guides lacking in an evidence base from research tend to read too much like lists of tips and tricks and are equally easily dismissed.

What is needed lies in the ‘Goldilocks Zone’: neither too hard nor too soft, and capable of bridging the science of learning with the practical advice for instructors as to how to maximize that learning. Fortunately, such frameworks already exist and Simon Bates will highlight a couple of principles from one of them and illustrate how many of the other sessions at the coming CTLT Institute align with them. Simon Bates will also present some results on how such principles operate ‘in the wild’, based on his experience of introducing a novel type of online assessment into a first year general Physics course at UBC.

Resources:

Graphic Recording

CTLTI - 2013 - Bates1

Illustrations by Cindy Underhill

CTLTI - 2013 - Bates2

Illustrations by Cindy Underhill


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Pathways to Educational Leadership

Resources:

Download presentation slides

Adoption of Instructional Methods: What is the Role of Evidence?

Warren Code
Science Teaching and Learning Fellow, Carl Wieman Science Education Intiative

How do education research results inform post-secondary teaching practice?

This session will include some lessons learned from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at UBC and a recent wide survey of physics faculty in the United States (Henderson, Dancy, and Niewiadomska-Bugaj, Use of research-based instructional strategies in introductory physics: Where do faculty leave the innovation-decision process?, 2012, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.8.020104).

Participants will be asked to consider their own interactions with evidence-based practices as skeptics, adopters, and producers.

Note: though examples in this session will be drawn primarily from teaching in science disciplines, there will be essentially no science content; we expect that the results and questions they provoke will have much broader appeal.


Rm. 2.27, Fraser River Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Techniques and Technologies to Support Flexible Learning

Blended Learning Design Design: A Principled Approach

Janet McCracken, PhD
Instructional Designer/Project Manager, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

This session presents a conceptual framework for designing blended learning environments that takes into account the insights from literature on distance learning, online learning, and classroom teaching. We attempt to integrate these perspectives into a principled approach to the design of blended learning environments that focuses on learning needs in relation to the affordances of technology.

We present five main design activities within a blended learning framework:

  1. Describing organizational contexts
  2. Describing discipline-specific factors
  3. Identifying learning and teaching principles
  4. Articulating the complementary interaction between classroom and online learning activities
  5. Selecting and situating appropriate learning technologies

We illustrate the utility of the framework through illustrative examples of blended learning designs in research university settings.


Rm. 2.27, Fraser River Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Techniques and Technologies to Support Flexible Learning

Video:

Open Courses, Open Pedagogies

Christina Hendricks, Senior Instructor, Department of Philosophy
Jon Beasley-Murray, Associate Professor, Department of French, Hispanic and Italian Studies
Jon Festinger, Q.C., Faculty, Centre for Digital Media

The word “open” is increasingly being mentioned in conjunction with teaching and learning. Open education is an effort to eliminate access barriers, such as time and location, and this session will feature multiple instructors who have embraced an open approach in their teaching and learning projects:

  • The Arts One Digital project is an open, online extension to the Arts One program that combines History, English, and Philosophy to introduce students to some of the classic texts of the past two millennia of world civilization. The goal of Arts One Digital project is to enable anyone to join this voyage of discovery and critical analysis.
  • VideoGameLaw is the course blog for LAW450:Video Game Law and features open course content as well as students, instructors, and industry experts engaging in dialogue and discussion about the legal aspects of the digital media and video game. The goal of LAW450 is to continue scholarship in these areas.

This session will explore their motivations and definitions for what “open” means. In addition to hearing their stories, we will discuss the impact openness had on their pedagogy, student engagement, and use of technology. We will also look at how to determine if these efforts are meeting the instructors goals and improving the student experience.


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning

Not Just a Symbolic Day! Truth and Reconciliation Commission Observance Day on September 18

Rima Wilkes, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Rick Ouellet, Student and Community Development Officer, First Nations House of Learning
Amy Perrault, Aboriginal Initiatives Coordinator, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

The University of British Columbia is dedicated to developing a better understanding of Indian Residential School histories, the policies that guided the operations of the schools, and their effects upon individuals and communities. The speakers believe that an acknowledgement and understanding of this history is necessary to the development of more functional and productive dialogues about our future that benefit all Canadians. For this reason, the University will be suspending most classes on Wednesday, September 18, 2013 so that students, professors, and other members of the university community may more fully participate in this historic event.

In preparation for the National Event on September 18-21, and the suspension of classes on the 18th, UBC professors, students, and organizations are engaging in a series of events and initiatives.

Please join us to share your ideas and learn what others on campus are doing in in preparation of this symbolic event.


Tuesday, May 28, 2013


Seminar Rm. 2.22, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning

Learning into Complexity: Teaching and Learning Through Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt

Amy Perrault, Aboriginal Initiatives Coordinator, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Gillian Gerhard, Manager, Graduate Student Programs, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

This session draws on complexity theories in education and the pedagogy of discomfort to explore ways that, as a teacher, you can help students learn to deal with uncertainty, while experiencing and teaching in it yourself.

We will discuss getting comfortable with being uncomfortable, fostering spaces for taking risks, being in those spaces with students, and recovering productively when things go awry. We will share our own examples of facing participants’ resistance to conversations about Aboriginal initiatives in TA Training, and of teaching at the intersection of disciplines (some of which were not our own).

As a case study, we will consider the Truth & Reconciliation Commission and how each of us might support students’ engagement with it before, during, and after the day of suspended classes.


Rm. 2.27, Fraser River Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning

Team-based Learning: Transforming the Use of Learning Groups in the Classroom

Peter Ostafichuk
Senior Instructor, Department of Mechanical Engineering

In this highly interactive session you will get an opportunity to not only learn about Team-Based Learning (TBL), but also to experience it firsthand. TBL is a powerful instructional strategy that transforms the way groups are used in the classroom. It can effectively bring the outcomes of small group discussion and team work to large class settings. In this session you will experience the main instructional components of TBL, including individual and team readiness assurance process and team application exercise and reporting. You will also receive extensive support materials (electronically) on implementing TBL in your own courses.


Rm. 301, Lillooet Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Student Learning

Techniques and Technologies to Support Flexible Learning

Video:

The Flexible Learning Initiative: Supporting the Needs of Learners

Dr. Angela Redish, Professor, Department of Economics
Dr. Hugh Brock, Associate-Provost, Academic Innovation

UBC has recently launched a new initiative to support flexible approaches to teaching and learning to meet the varying needs of a new generation of students. A flexible teaching model blends traditional classroom environments with online components, interactive distance dialogues and small support groups. The primary objective of this effort is to enhance the learning experience of UBC students – and as such it is integral to UBC’s Place and Promise commitments. The university is invested in this change and President Toope has created a flexible learning implementation team, led by Vice-Provost Angela Redish, to support participating faculty with the transition of their courses.

In this session, members of the flexible learning implementation team will provide an overview of the flexible learning initiative, including:

  • Background of the initiative, including UBC’s strategic assessment of the effect of new learning models and online delivery formats on higher education’s traditional structures, as well as the focus and goals of the initiative
  • Benefits to student learning
  • Opportunities and support for engaging in new and emerging teaching methods


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Techniques and Technologies to Support Flexible Learning

Open Textbooks Workshop

Mary Burgess
Director, Curriculum Services and Applied Research, BCcampus

In October 2012, the government of British Columbia announced its support for the creation of open textbooks for the 40 highest-impact first and second-year courses in the province’s public post-secondary system. This project has generated a lot of interest in open textbooks in general, the financial benefits they may have for students, and the impact such open educational resources may have on curriculum development and flexible pedagogies. This session will provide an overview of open textbooks and will specifically explore:

  • Individual faculty and institutional changes in practice
  • Benefits and challenges of adopting an open textbook
  • Options for finding, selecting, and building on existing open educational resources (OER)
  • An update on the BC open text book project

We will also share experiences to gain insights into what we should be aware of when venturing into the use of OER.


Rm. 2.27, Fraser River Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning

Implementing Formative Student Feedback on Teaching: Benefits and Challenges

Janice Johnson
Manager, Facilitation and Process Design, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

Students can provide useful formative (during a course) feedback for continuous teaching improvement. Asking for, providing, and responding to this feedback in respectful ways can benefit both instructors and students. While such feedback may not always be flattering, and this can be a challenge, reflective practitioners make evidence-based decisions in their teaching. How we respond to formative feedback, whether positive or negative, is more important to the improvement of teaching and learning than the feedback itself.

Boice (1987) found that formative evaluation leads to three positive changes:

  • It raises term-end evaluations
  • It leads to the introduction of alternative teaching behaviours
  • It improves “classroom comfort” for both instructors and students.

During this interactive seminar, we will discuss the benefits and challenges of formative evaluation; consider some effective, manageable ways to solicit formative evaluation data, and use simulations and guided practice to prepare for implementation.


Wednesday, May 29, 2013


Rm. 2.27, Fraser River Room

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning

Resources:

Below is a gallery of some of the work produced during the session.

Weaving Artistic Practices into Teaching and Learning: Exploring Possibilities

Shauna Butterwick, Associate Professor, Department of Educational Studies
Shaya Golparian, Resource Room Coordinator, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Roselynn Verwoord, Evaluation and Research Coordinator, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

In this workshop we will explore how arts-based activities and creative expression can support learners to develop understandings of concepts and theories.

Arts-based and creative processes include such activities as drawing, collage, poetry, quilting, embodied/drama-based exercises, and so on. Can the arts be used in any academic discipline or context to support and enhance student learning or are they only useful in Faculties of Arts and Humanities? What kind of knowledge, background, or experience does an instructor need in order to use the arts? If these are questions that you are curious about or if you have additional questions or curiosities about the use of the arts in teaching and learning, we invite you to join us for a two and a half hour exploration of the use of various art forms in supporting teaching and learning.

In this session, participants will be invited to engage with various artistic media (fabric, crayons/markers, images, etc.) to experience the impact that the arts can have for supporting deeper understandings of concepts and theories. Participants will also have the opportunity to reflect on how they might incorporate artistic media into teaching and learning experiences across diverse disciplines and settings.


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Pathways to Educational Leadership

Resources:

Download the PPT

Professor of Teaching Information Session and Panel

Moderator

Gillian Gerhard, Manager, Graduate Student Programs, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

Presenters

  • Anna Kindler, Vice Provost and Associate Vice President Academic
  • Judith Daniluk, Senior Appointment Committee Chair

Panelists

  • Douglas Bonn, Physics
  • Jon Mikkelsen, Mechanical Engineering
  • Lacey Samuels, Botany
  • Sheldon Green, Mechanical Engineering
  • Shona Ellis, Botany
  • Simon Bates, Physics
  • William Milsom, Zoology

The rank of Professor of Teaching was introduced in 2011 as the highest academic rank for the teaching stream and was designed to mirror the position of Full Professor. Promotion to or appointment to the rank of Professor of Teaching requires evidence of outstanding achievement in educational leadership, teaching and learning, curriculum development, pedagogical innovation, and service. We invite teaching stream faculty and their department heads to learn more about the requirements for promotion to the rank of Professor Teaching and to hear from individuals who have gone through the process. Dr. Anna Kindler, Vice Provost and Associate Vice President Academic will present. Panelists will include faculty members who have recently been promoted to the rank of Professor of Teaching and Department Heads who have recommended their promotion. Bring your questions.


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Student Learning

Learning Experiences of English as Additional Language (EAL) Students

Eilidh Singh
Academic English Support Coach/ Instructor
English Language Institute, UBC Continuing Studies

Consider the UBC student population: 79% speak two or more languages, and 50% speak English as their mother tongue. How can instructors draw the full academic potential out of our linguistically diverse students?

In this session, a panel of undergraduate and graduate students and a language coach in the Academic English Support program at UBC will share their experiences in the program to explore how the learning of EAL students can be best supported. The session invites audience from across disciplines and professional capacities to discuss how we all can work toward creating an inclusive teaching and learning environment for linguistically diverse students at UBC.


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Student Learning

Techniques and Technologies to Support Flexible Learning

Flipping to Support Flexible Learning in a Large First Year Classroom

Celeste Leander, Instructor, Department of Botany
Pam Kalas, Instructor, Department of Zoology

The speakers will share and model their experience using a flipped classroom approach in a first year biology course to support learning of over 200 both major and non-major students. Participants will experience a shortened “lecture” that uses a flipped classroom approach, including preparatory pre-class and in-class activities, and an interactive demonstration of after-class online support using Facebook and Blackboard Collaborate. Experiencing these activities and reflecting on their own experience in the classroom, participants will discuss and brainstorm questions and ideas relating to the flipped classroom approach, and will have the opportunity to start planning how to apply this approach to a lesson/course in their own disciplines.


Rm. 2.27, Fraser River Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Pathways to Educational Leadership

Teaching Portfolios for Promotion and Tenure

Simon Ellis
Associate Professor, Department of Wood Science

Evidence of your teaching and research accomplishments should be gathered with equal commitment and care. In developing a teaching portfolio, you learn to collect relevant materials, present them in an organized fashion, and reflect upon your teaching values and philosophy. This workshop sets the stage for the development of your own teaching portfolio. We will focus on suggested approaches regarding documentation, and discuss the collection and organization of material. This session is intended primarily for faculty members who are pre-tenure or under consideration for promotion, but all are welcome. You may wish to review Teaching Portfolio at http://wiki.ubc.ca/index.php?oldid=45734.


Thursday, May 30, 2013


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning
Student Learning

Resources:

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Supporting Student Metacognition

Jason McAllister, Lead Facilitator, Graduate Student Programs, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Joseph Topornycky, TA Training Coordinator, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

Learning is an active process. How can you help your learners actively learn during your lessons? Metacognition provides insight and strategies that help learners understand and realize how they learn, empowering learners and assisting in cross curriculum applications. In this workshop, following definition of metacognition and discussions from the literature, examples will demonstrate incorporation of metacognitive processes within lessons. Participants will utilize content and activities gained from the workshop to develop a lesson plan integrating metacognition, providing opportunity for application in the classroom.


Rm. 2.27, Fraser River Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Techniques and Technologies to Support Flexible Learning

Resources:

Teaching & Learning in Connect: Principles, Strategies and Tools

Lucas Wright, Learning Technology Specialist, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Emily Renoe, Learning Technology Specialist, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Roselynn Verwoord, Evaluation and Research Coordinator, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Zack Lee, Educational Resources Developer, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

This hands-on workshop is designed for faculty who want to learn and discover 7 research-based principles and strategies (based on Susan Ambrose’s How Learning Works) for effective teaching and learning within the context of UBC’s Connect.

You will be able to:

  • explore how to use the 7 principles of learning to promote more effective learner-centred environments
  • identify application of evidence-based teaching practices in Connect
  • reflect about how learning works and encourage a curiosity about learning

All participants are expected to have completed a ‘Getting Started in Connect’ workshop, which is available on May 23: http://events.ctlt.ubc.ca/events/view/2379.


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Techniques and Technologies to Support Flexible Learning

Teaching in the Land of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device)

Jim Hope
Instructor, Continuing Studies

How has teaching changed in the context of extremely portable devices like smart phones and tablets? How do you measure engagement? How can you teach in a room without walls? How can you leverage the technology?

For over thirty years, the speaker has worked on the premise that technology can be a great place to start a conversation. Let’s hope that this new trend is not the end of conversation. Please join us for a lively discussion of how this phenomenon is impacting you, your students, and your practice, with the view to coming up with practical ways to be part of this ever changing landscape.


Rm 2.27, Fraser River Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Learning with UBC Supported Technologies

Bonita Bray, Strategist, LMS Professional Development, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Joe Zerdin, Emerging Technologies Analyst, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Novak Rogic, Web Strategy Manager, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Pan Luo, Programmer Analyst, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

Technology is a powerful resource that can be used to strengthen existing educational practices. UBC faculty members have embraced the use of a wide-range of technology approaches and tools to support their teaching and learning goals. Learning management systems, Blogs, Wikis, Websites, i>Clickers, e-portfolios,… the list is extensive. These technologies can be leveraged to enhance learning and provide you with more flexibility in your teaching.

Three common questions that most faculty have about these tools are:

  1. Why would I use a particular tool or method?
  2. How can they help me meet my learning goals?
  3. Who can I go to for advice and support?

This workshop will look at these questions. Through case examples and demonstrations, you will be introduced to a selection of the tools. You will also have an opportunity to discuss why faculty have chosen to use particular tools and techniques, and meet some of the staff who support faculty at UBC. This workshop will be a combination of demonstration, sharing and discussion.


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning

The Art of Play and Presence: Theatre Techniques for the Classroom

Sarah Louise Turner, Teaching Enhancement Specialist (voice), Simon Fraser University
Ashley Whillans, Graduate Student, Department of Psychology

Skilled actors awe crowds with their physical prowess, vocal strength, flexibility and most importantly, their ability to forge a deep connection with an audience. How can we, as teachers, make use of these techniques in the classroom? This popular workshop will reveal an actor’s secret to success, as we explore proven techniques in warming up before the performance (class) and performing (lecture) at your best, by strengthening authenticity, vocal control, body language, creativity, and awareness of the audience. You will be swept into the action with activities that strengthen your impulses, identify your common habits, explore new skills and increase your confidence. This session will allow you to explore various acting techniques aimed at improving the effectiveness of your teaching.


Friday, May 31, 2013


Rm. 182, Victoria Lecture Theatre, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Techniques and Technologies to Support Flexible Learning

Video:

Note: The session will start at approximately 8:30AM PST.

Having trouble accessing the media player? Click here to access the stand-alone player.

Liveblog:


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Teaching, Learning, and the MOOC

Moderator

Simon Peacock, Dean, Faculty of Science

Panelists

  • David Farrar, Provost and Vice President Academic
  • Angela Redish, Vice-Provost and Associate Vice President, Enrolment and Academic Facilities
  • Gregor Kiczales, Computer Science
  • Kevin Leyton-brown, Computer Science
  • Rosemary Redfield, Zoology
  • Sara Harris, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Daphne Koller, Founder, Coursera; Professor, School of Engineering Stanford University

UBC is internationally recognized for its technology-enhanced learning initiatives and last fall, UBC announced an agreement with Coursera to provide free, publicly available non-credit courses to a worldwide audience. Courses delivered through the Coursera platform are structured after Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), an emerging delivery model predicated on providing free and open access to courses to large numbers of students. During the first half of 2013, about 200,000 new students will be added to UBC’s learning community through the launch of UBC’s initial four-course MOOC pilot.

Although UBC has many decades of experience with continuing, blended and distance education, MOOCs afford unique opportunities to examine questions that relate to large numbers of learners. For example, how well does a peer-based assessment model work for learning? How can the University most effectively implement “flipped-classrooms” and flexible learning models to enhance student learning? How does the University’s core academic mission fit with open, online learning? In this panel, senior UBC officials, the instructors from UBC’s four-course MOOC pilot, and Daphne Koller, Founder of Coursera, will discuss the impacts of MOOCs as well as the faculty perspective on designing and teaching MOOCs that maximize learning.


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Student Learning
Techniques and Technologies to Support Flexible Learning

Resources:

Students and Open Resources and Practices: A Conversation

Illustrations by Zack Lee

Students and Open Resources and Practices: A Conversation

Cindy Underhill
Learning Resource Design Strategist, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

Open and flexible. Join us for a lunchtime conversation about open and flexible practices at UBC. What are some examples (beyond MOOCs)? What are the possibilities? What do students think? What are the competencies, skills and attitudes that support open and flexible practices? We are hoping to explore these questions and raise many more in conversation with students, faculty and others interested in learning.


Rm. 2.27, Fraser River Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning

Learning Together: Using Two-Stage Exams to Reinforce Examined Concepts

Brett Gilley
CWSEI Teaching and Learning Fellow
Geoscience Education, Sedimentology

Exams are typically used for evaluation in post secondary education, two stage exams are a simple technique that changes exams into a powerful learning experience. In two stage exams (aka cooperative exams, group exams, or pyramid exams) students complete a test as individuals and then immediately complete the same, or very similar, test collaboratively in groups of about 4. The student’s recent studying and the high stakes environment of the exam create very focused and useful discussions among the groups. Join Brett Gilley of the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative for a discussion of how two stage exams can help your students learn.


Seminar Rm. 2.22 A/B, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Theme(s):

Transformative Teaching and Learning
Student Learning

Students as Content Creators: Perspectives from Instructors and Students

Greg Kozak, Adjunct Professor, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies
Brian Wilson, Instructional Designer/Project Manager, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

In this workshop, we will explore the role that students can play as creators and co-creators of course content and open education resources. You will have the opportunity to hear about the experience from both the instructors’ and students’ points of view and the lessons learned by each. We will discuss the impetus for such projects, the implementation process, measuring success and the alignment between the goals and outcomes. We will also discuss possible modes of delivery and considerations for the choice of technology. Most importantly though, we will be engaging you in discussing how you might implement similar projects in your context.