2011 Schedule

Click here for CTLT Institute schedule

Tuesday, May 24

9:00AM - 9:30AM

Registration

9:30AM - 11:30AM

Session : Exploring Variations on a Theme of Highly Effective Teaching

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitator: Dan Pratt

Description:

This session will provide an overview of eight research-based findings about highly effective teachers, and how those findings relate to contrasting perspectives on teaching in higher education. The session will also provide you with an opportunity to compare your views on teaching with hundreds of other teachers in the social sciences, basic sciences, math, humanities, and health sciences.

Bring three copies of your Teaching Perspectives Inventory (TPI) profile to the session. The profile is a graph showing your scores on five perspectives. It’s free, and will take about 15 minutes to complete. Go to: www.TeachingPerspectives.com. When taking the TPI - Focus, Focus, Focus: It’s important that you focus on one, and only one, subject, venue, and group of learners throughout the inventory.

Session 2: Post-Access Copyright: Implications for Your Teaching

Location: Fraser River Room

Facilitator: Joy Kirchner

Description:

University of British Columbia’s agreement with Access Copyright, the collective that licenses photocopying and print course packs for most post-secondary institutions in Canada, is under review. In the absence of such a license, some common University copying practices may no longer be authorized, and may in fact constitute an infringement of copyright. This session will cover Access Copyright, copyright, and alternatives that faculty may choose to use instead.

11:35AM - 11:55AM

CTLT Showcase 1: Distributed Learning: A Model for Graduate Training in Public Health

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitator: Patti Jansen

Description:

The Master of Public Health Program in the School of Population and Public Health enrolled its first cohort of students in September 2008. The program was developed in response to the Government of BC’s strategic plan for safe, healthy communities and a sustainable environment. In 2009, the School offered the MPH degree program in a “distributed format,” in which students have class time in a four-day concentration three times per term, in addition to distance learning. The objective of the DL format is to allow practicing public health professionals to remain in the workforce while attending classes, and to encourage application of knowledge in practicum experiences in their own community. Our goal is to promote equitable opportunity for access to graduate education in public health throughout the province.

12:15PM - 12:45PM

Lunch n' Learn 1: Exploring eReaders in the Library

Location: Dodson Room

Facilitator: Trish Rosseel

Description:

UBC Library has purchased a number of different eReaders [Sony Readers, Amazon Kindles, Apple iPads] for use by Library employees. This acquisition is part of a staff lending pilot to test these devices for academic reading--including accessing UBC Library licensed digital collections--and to evaluate the possibility of a public eReader lending program. Come to this session to take a look at a few eReaders and to hear about what we’ve been learning from our pilot project! Registered participants will be given tickets for a draw to win an iPod Shuffle.

Lunch will be served to participants who have registered for this session.

1:00PM - 3:00PM

Session 3: Free Stuff! Finding and Reusing Open Educational Resources

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitator: Brian Lamb

Description:

Open educational resources (OERs) are learning materials that are readily available online, licensed to allow free reuse, and usually available in formats that allow customization for your needs. The past few years has seen an explosion in the availability of OERs, and the introductions of many tools and services to facilitate their use. This hands-on session will explore some of the available collections across academic disciplines, discuss the issues related to Creative Commons and fair use of copyrighted materials, and consider examples of effective reuse.

Session 4: Beyond Concept Maps: Mindmapping for Research, Teaching & Learning & Multifaceted Sustainabiliy

Location: Fraser River Room

Description: The discovery and illumination of a life-centric and transformative worldview is central to my research, education, and mindmapping goals. Mindmaps are not networks, and are not equivalent to concept maps. Mindmaps mimic nature while highlighting process, patterns, self-organization, and emergence. Mindmapping unites words and shapes into simple patterns; mindmapping is fun and facilitates transformative understanding. Participants in this seminar will:

  1. learn to contrast complex phenomena (nature) with complicated systems (technology), while appreciating and applying that understanding to their own work and life;
  2. survey the diversity of mindmap forms/types (and their applications) via an engaging narrative told through mindmaps, and
  3. create a mindmap of their own that illuminates a research-related concept, a course syllabus, or the essential elements that catalyze and perpetuate personal sustainability.

Wednesday, May 25

9:00AM - 9:30AM

Registration

9:30AM - 11:30AM

Session 05: When the Media Calls

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitators: Randy Schmidt & Brian Lin

Description:

Being interviewed by the media about your research, or for expert analysis of a current news story, can be intimidating. While there are clear benefits to being profiled in the news, professors and researchers are often concerned about being misquoted, or taken out of context.

This training seminar, led by UBC Public Affairs, will cover several topics including how the media can advance your academic goals, understanding how editors and reporters think, interview preparation tips, and developing key messages. The purpose of the seminar is to equip you with the skills to maximize the likelihood that the news story will convey information in a way that is important to you.

Session 6: Teaching Portfolios

Location: Fraser River Room

Facilitators: Emily Renoe, Lucas Wright

Description:

Teaching portfolios are being increasingly used by faculty members as a way to chart and reflect on their practice as well as for tenure, promotion and hiring in the context of higher education. If you are in the process of developing or starting to think about developing a teaching portfolio this workshop will provide you with an understanding of the overall context, and components of an portfolio as well as get you started articulating and providing evidence for your teaching approaches and beliefs. You will also have an opportunity to begi developing your teaching portfolio using WordPress MU.

11:35AM - 11:55AM

CTLT Showcase 2: Communicating Science

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitator: Eric Jandciu

Description:

Communicating Science (SCIE 300) is a new, highly interactive course in the Faculty of Science that aims to promote the development of scientific communication skills. The pilot run focused on communicating with the scientific community through papers and conference presentations. Students peer-reviewed written submissions using Turnitin’s Peermark feature and self-assessed video recordings of their presentations on the course YouTube channel. For the portion of the course asking students to consider broader audiences, SCIE 300 incorporated a variety of technologies for telling science stories. For example, students interviewed UBC researchers and produced videos and podcasts intended for non-expert audiences. Students also contributed to a course blog about science communication.

12:15PM - 12:45PM

Lunch n' Learn 2: Mobile Devices

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitators: Lucas Wright, Emily Renoe, Joe Zerdin, Kyle Gailing, Zack Lee & Cindy Underhill

Description:

In this session, we will explore mobile technology as it relates to teaching and learning in higher education. This will be an exploratory session looking at easy ways to publish content to mobile devices, visual note taking, and web applications versus platform applications. Registered participants will be given tickets for a draw to win an iPod Shuffle.

Lunch will be served to participants who have registered for this session.

1:00PM - 3:00PM

Session 7: All the World's a Stage: Teachers as Actors

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitator: Greg Bole

Description:

How is teaching like acting? Find out in the fifth encore performance of this popular workshop. We will discuss warming up before the performance (class), and how to perform (lecture) at your best by improving your honesty, vocal control, body language, creativity, and awareness of the audience. You will be swept into the action with activities like Woosh!, Line Delivery, Body Language and Microscenes. This session allows you to play, practice and discuss various acting games and ideas aimed at improving the effectiveness of your teaching.

Session 8: Implementing Concurrent Student Feedback on Teaching: Benefits and Challenges

Location: Fraser River Room

Facilitator: Janice Johnson

Description:

Students can provide useful formative (during a course) feedback for continuous teaching improvement. Asking for, providing, and responding to this feedback in respectful ways can benefit both instructors and students. While such feedback may not always be flattering, and this can be a challenge, reflective practitioners make evidence-based decisions in their teaching. How we respond to concurrent feedback, whether positive or negative, is more important to the improvement of teaching and learning than the feedback itself. Boice (1987) found that concurrent (formative) evaluation leads to three positive changes: It raises term-end evaluations It leads to the introduction of alternative teaching behaviours It improves “classroom comfort” for both instructors and students. During this interactive seminar, we will discuss the benefits and challenges of concurrent evaluation; consider some effective, manageable ways to solicit concurrent evaluation data, and use simulations and guided practice to prepare for implementation. Please note that this is a 3-hour session.

3:15pm-4:15pm

Session 9: Comments from the Edge

Location: Dodson Room

Facilitator: Cindy Underhill

Description:

Each year, the Edge Foundation <http://www.edge.org/about_edge.html>, a network of prominent scientists and creative thinkers assembled by New York literary agent John Brockman <http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/bios/brockman.html>, poses a question to the world community. This year’s question is “what scientific concept would improve everybody’s cognitive toolkit?” We’ll pull together some snippets from the responses to this question so far and pose them to the group for discussion. This is a chance to exercise your mind and contribute to collective learning.

Thursday, May 26

9:00AM - 9:30AM

Registration

9:30AM - 11:30AM

Session 9: Team-Based Learning

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitator: Jim Sibley

Description:

This will be a very interactive session! It will introduce you to the very powerful Team-Based Learning (TBL) instructional strategy. TBL is a strategy that can bring the powerful outcomes of small group discussion and team work effectively to large class settings. You will experience the main instructional components of TBL, including individual and team readiness assurance process and team application exercise and reporting. You will also receive extensive readings (electronically) on implementing TBL in your own courses.

Session 10: Instructor Capacity-building for Working with Aboriginal Topics in Diverse Classrooms

Location: Fraser River Room

Facilitators: Amy Perrault & Erin Hanson

Description:

"During this session Amy Perreault, Coordinator of Aboriginal Initiatives at CTLT and Erin Hanson, Research Project Manager for Indigenous Foundations in the First Nations Studies Program will present two research projects that have been developed to assist instructors, students and administrators to find ways to have more in-depth discussions of contentious classroom conversations around Aboriginal content.

What I Learned In Class Today: www.whatilearnedinclasstoday.com

This project examines the classroom experiences of students, instructors, and administrators at UBC in order to make these problems visible, better understand how difficulties arise, and to find ways to have more professional and productive classroom discussions. Work on this project clearly identified the complexities and challenges of classroom conversations involving contentious cross-cultural discussions, and in specific discourse around Aboriginal curriculum. Indigenous Foundations: indigenousfoundations.arts.ubc.ca

Indigenous Foundations is a website project developed by the First Nations Studies Program. It provides an accessible starting point for instructors, researchers, and students in any discipline who want to learn more about Aboriginal cultures, politics, and histories. The information presented is concise and easily digestible, while still conveying the depth and complexities of the topics. Indigenous Foundations incorporates learning tools such as video interviews and other multimedia outlets to create an engaging resource. "

11:35AM - 11:55AM

CTLT Showcase 3: Peer Evaluation

Location: Dodson Room

Facilitators: Andrea Han, Alison Wong, Pan Luo

Description:

Peer evaluation can be used to improve the writing process, and as a means of integrating writing into large enrolment courses. In this session, we’ll explore three peer evaluation tools available at UBC: iPeer, Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) and TurnItIn. While each of these tools offers students the opportunity to provide anonymous feedback to their peers and to review peer feedback to improve their own writing, the tools are also unique. iPeer, developed at UBC, includes a team-maker component that allows instructors to easily group students according to their responses to an instructor-generated survey. CPR was designed to encourage writing in large enrolment science courses, and TurnItIn also includes a plagiarism detection component. Learn about each of these tools and decide which is the best fit for your class!

12:15PM - 12:45PM

Lunch n' Learn: Peer Evaluation

Location: Dodson Room

Facilitators: Andrea Han, Alison Wong & Pan Luo

Description:

This Lunch 'n' Learn is a continuation of the Peer Eval Showcase session immediately preceding this. Registered participants will be given tickets for a draw to win an iPod Shuffle.

Lunch will be served to participants who have registered for this session.

1:00PM - 3:00PM

Session 11: Teaching with Technology: Wikis, WordPress and More

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitators: Novak Rogic & Will Engle

Description:

Communication is a key component of successful teaching and technology can help create a dialogue both inside and outside of the classroom. This user-friendly session will provide a crash course on the CTLT’s online publishing framework. Learn how you can easily turn your course notes into a downloadable ebook, engage your students in a private space, or receive instant lecture-hall feedback via twitter-like microblogging. Through the use of blogs, wikis, websites, groups, forums, and other technologies, you can empower your students and increase active learning. Best of all, these tools are all hosted, supported, and freely provided by the CTLT. This will be informal hands-on workshop with lively discussion and activities that focus on UBC supported technology that can enhance your learning and teaching environments.

Session 12: Using Debate in the Classroom: Students Rise to the Challenge

Location: Fraser River Room

Facilitator: Gail Hammond

Description:

Are you looking for new strategies that will engage your students in active learning, critical thinking, and real world problem solving? Why not try debate? Debate is an effective pedagogical tool for enhancing student engagement and learning, and for developing life-long learning skills. In this workshop, you will be given an opportunity to learn about, practice, and discuss using debate as a tool in the classroom. Brainstorming, delivering coherent and persuasive arguments and rebuttals, thinking critically (on your feet!), and giving and receiving meaningful feedback are some of the activities that you will experience during this interactive workshop.

Friday, May 27

9:00AM - 9:30AM

Registration

9:30AM - 11:30AM

Session 13: Creating Successful TLEF Proposals

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitator: Harry Hubball

Description:

The Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) is available to enrich student learning by supporting and encouraging innovative teaching at UBC Vancouver. Each year, all UBC Faculties, undergraduate students, and graduate students are invited to make applications to the TLEF for projects ranging from $1,000 to a maximum of $150,000. Student involvement in preparing, reviewing, and/or implementing the proposals is essential. This workshop is intended to help prospective applicants understand the criteria and other key elements for approval.

Session 14: Qualitative and Quantitative Research: How Do We Validate These Forms of Knowing?

Location: Fraser River Room

Facilitator: Joanne Nakonechny

Description:

In trying to improve our teaching and students' learning, we often use qualitative and/or quantitative research methods. Current researchers often blend qualitative and quantitative research methods without understanding what each tradition brings to the research question. Come and join this session if you are interested in examining the qualities and research potential for each of these methods.

11:35AM - 11:55AM

TLEF Showcase'

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitators: Successful TLEF Applicants

Description:

Successful TLEF applicants are invited to showcase their projects via a poster presentation. Project teams are available to chat about their progresses and discuss their results. Come prepared to explore the range of TLEF project ideas and be inspired!

12:15PM - 12:45PM

Lunch n' Learn: Designing For Accessibility

Location: Dodson Room

Facilitator: Afsaneh Sharif

Description:

No students should be left behind! Interest in the online environment and in online learning demands that universities and educators address issues of accessibility in online environments and projects more closely. This session will provide participants with different techniques and guidelines to make their online environments more accessible. Techniques and checklists developed in compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines will be discussed and shared. Registered participants will be given tickets for a draw to win an iPod Shuffle.

Lunch will be served to participants who have registered for this session.

1:00PM - 3:00PM

Session 15: Developing a Unit-Level ISoTL Program: Reflections and Lessons Learned

Location: Rm. 2.22

Facilitator: John Egan

Description:

In this session, John will describe an internal CTLT initiative to support the development of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning projects within the unit.

source: http://wiki.ubc.ca/Documentation:CTLT_programs/CTLT_Institute/2011_Schedule

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